Jon Atkinson - Wildlife And Travel Photographer

Galapagos Birds

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Galapagos Penguin
Flightless Cormorant
Flightless Cormorant
Brown Pelican
Brown Pelican
Galapagos Birds 1 - Galapagos Penguins, Isla Isabela: Galapagos Penguin is endemic to the Galapagos archipelago, with 95% of the population occurring on the western islands of Fernandina and Isabela, and 5% on Bartolomé, Santiago and Floreana.
Galapagos Birds 2 - Flightless Cormorant, Isla Isabela: The Flightless Cormorant, also known as the Galapagos Cormorant, is native to the Galapagos Islands. It is unique in that it is the only cormorant that has lost the ability to fly. it has a very restricted range. It is found on just two islands; Fernandina, where it is found mainly on the east coast, as well as on the northern and western coasts of Isabela.
Galapagos Birds 3 - Brown Pelican, Isla Fernandina: In addition to Galapagos, the Brown Pelican is found along the western coasts of northen South America, Central America, and North America, and throughout the Caribbean. The Galapagos population of brown pelican is considered to be an endemic subspecies.
Magnificent Frigatebirds
Magnificent Frigatebirds
Magnificent Frigatebirds
Galapagos Birds 4 - Magnificent Frigatebirds, at sea off Isla Isabella: The Magnificent Frigatebird was sometimes previously known as Man O'War, reflecting its rakish lines, speed, and aerial piracy of other birds.
Galapagos Birds 5 - Magnificent Frigatebirds, at sea off Isla Isabella: The Magnificent Frigatebird has a large range ans is found on the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of America, from Baja California to Ecuador, including Galapagos, and from Florida to S Brazil; also relic population on Cape Verde Islands, off West Africa.
Galapagos Birds 6 - Magnificent Frigatebirds, at sea off Isla Isabella: The Magnificent Frigatebird species feeds mainly on fish, and also attacks other seabirds to force them to disgorge their meals. Frigatebirds never land on water, and always take their food items in flight.
Vermillion Flycatcher
Vermillion Flycatcher
Galapagos Birds 7 - Greater Flamingo, Floreana Island: The Greater Flamingo lives around the brackish waters of some lagoons located in several Islands of the Galapagos. These shore birds move their bills upside down underwater to gather and sift the bottom sediment. Flamingos feed on crustaceans like shrimp and small water plants.
Galapagos Birds 8 - Vermillion Flycatcher uses Galapagos Tortoise as a spot to hunt insects from, Isla Santa Cruz: The Vermilion Flycatcher is a small passerine bird that can be found in the southwestern United States, Central America, and northern and central South America, and southwards to central Argentina; also in the Galapagos Island.
Galapagos Birds 9 - Vermillion Flycatcher uses Galapagos Tortoise as a spot to hunt insects from, Isla Santa Cruz: The subspecies found on Isla Santa Cruz in an endemic form of Vermilion Flycatcher. They feed mainly on insects such as flies, grasshoppers and beetles which are usually taken from mid-air, after a short sally flight from a perch which in the Galapagos can include the backs of the native tortoises.
Nazca Booby
Nazca Booby
Galapagos Birds 10 - Galapagos Hawk, Isla Baltra: The Galapagos Hawk is endemic to the Galapagos Islands. Known for its fearlessness towards humans and authority over the islands as the only original predator, this bird has inhabited the Galapagos archipelago for over 300,000 years.
Galapagos Birds 11 - Nazca Booby, Espanola: The Nazca Booby is endemic to islands on the Nazca tectonic plate, primarily the Galapagos Islands. Boobies are strictly marine birds, feeding primarily on fish, and they come ashore only to nest or roost.
Galapagos Birds 12 - Nazca Booby, Espanola: Nazca boobies are known for practicing obligate siblicide. They lay two eggs, several days apart. If both eggs hatch, the elder chick will push its sibling out of the nest area, leaving it to die of thirst or cold. The parent booby will not intervene and the younger chick will inevitably die. It is believed that two eggs are laid so that one remains an insurance in case the other gets destroyed or eaten, or the chick dies soon after hatching.
Brown Pelican
Waved Albatross
Galapagos Birds 13 - Blue-Footed Boobys engage in mating ritual, Isla Espanola: There are approximately 40,000 breeding pairs of blue-footed boobies in the world and half of them inhabit the Galapagos Islands Male blue-footed boobies show off their blue feet during their courtship dance by picking up their feet and displaying them in exagerated steps.
Galapagos Birds 14 - Brown Pelican swallows fish on Isla Santa Cruz, Galapagos: Brown Pelicans have a monstrous large bill, more than a foot long, with a cot, or bag, growing to the underpart of the bill. The underjaw is divided in such a manner that it can be spread open similar to a net bow, so as to contain near a peck of grain.
Galapagos Birds 15 - Waved Albatross initiating mating dance, Isla Espanola: With a wingspan of 7-8 feet and a weight of 7-11 pounds, the waved albatross is the largest Galapagos bird. They are found on only one island,Espanola, where they congregate in two major colonies, one at Pta. Cevallos, and the other at Pta. Suarez, a visitor site. Like other birds that primarily glide, waved albatrosses rely on a strong headwind to take off.

All photography is copyright Jon Atkinson and images may not be reposted without express permission.